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Relating PMBOK Practices to Agile Practices - Risk

Page history last edited by margaret motamed 11 years, 6 months ago

Title:

Relating PMBOK Practices to Agile Practices - Risk 
Author: Michele Sliger 
Size: 1 web page 
Contributor: Margaret Motamed 
Posting Date: 4/22/09 

 

link: 

http://www.stickyminds.com/sitewide.asp?ObjectId=11133&Function=DETAILBROWSE&ObjectType=COL&sqry=%2AZ%28SM%29%2AJ%28MIXED%29%2AR%28relevance%29%2AK%28simplesite%29%2AF%28Relating+PMBOK+Practices+to+Agile+Practices%29%2A&sidx=1&sopp=10&sitewide.asp?sid=1&sqry=%2AZ%28SM%29%2AJ%28MIXED%29%2AR%28relevance%29%2AK%28simplesite%29%2AF%28Relating+PMBOK+Practices+to+Agile+Practices%29%2A&sidx=1&sopp=10

 

description: 

The team owns risk management in agile projects. The agile project manager facilitates the process and makes the results visible--whiteboards and flipcharts for collocated teams or in an online information-sharing tool for geographically dispersed teams. Risks are identified in all planning meetings: daily stand-ups, iteration planning meetings, and release planning meetings. Risks are then analyzed and addressed in these same iteration and release planning meetings, with the focus being on qualitative analysis rather than quantitative. Risks are subsequently monitored by the use of high-visibility information radiators, daily stand-ups, and iteration reviews and retrospectives.  

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